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What strategies can you use to differentiate learning in your classroom?

Get an overview of strategies here.



Pretests, Inventories, and Most Difficult

Demonstrating Mastery:: Students are provided opportunities to demonstrate (including opportunities to test out of instruction) proficiency, command or expertise in content, process or product of any given instruction in order to move to an interest area or more advanced kind of instruction.

Most Difficult First:: a very simple first step to full-scale compacting. It is usually used with skill-type activities such as math, grammar, map reading, vocabulary, or spelling. A teacher allows students to demonstrate mastery of the five most difficult problems of an assignment and then to participate in alternate activities without having to do an entire assignment.

Tiered Lesson


Tiered Lessons:
Take a look at Tiered Lessons created for K-12 teachers within Science, Math and Language Arts. This resource gives you a better understanding of how to build your instruction for your students.

Spin-Off's


Spin-Offs: A designated area or portable center enriches a student’s interest in a given content area while students rotate among centers by choice or as assigned by the teacher.
Overview of learning/interest centers



Learning Stations


Learning Stations:
A designated area or portable center enriches a student’s interest in a given content area while students rotate among centers by choice or as assigned by the teacher.
Overview of learning/interest centers


Menus, Choice Boards, Tic-Tac-Toe, and Cubing


Menus and Choice Boards:
The use of menus with their associated list of activites and explorations can be easily used to provide differentiation for advanced learners.
Here is a site with sample menus.

Tic-Tac-Toe: Differentiation strategy using a tic-tac-toe board of student activity choices.

Cubing: Differentiation strategy to tier a lesson by the complexity of questions. Questions are attached to the sides of cubes, each cube a different level of complexity. Students roll their assigned cube and answer the question shown.

Enrichment Clusters


Enrichment:
Students are grouped and re-grouped according to interest areas.Topics and activities that are valuable and interesting to learn, but are not basic education. Knowledge that is "nice to know" but not necessarily what people "need to know".

Resource: Developing an Enrichment Cluster


Independent Study using the Topic Browser and Resident Expert Planner


Independent Study:
Opportunities for students at all readiness levels to pursue topics that interest them. Susan Winebrenner suggests that students use structured independent studies to become "resident experts." Allows a student or small group of students to pursue an area of interest related to a specific curricular area.

The Multiple Menu Model


Multiple Menu Model:


Webquests


Webquests: A programmed, self-contained activity on the Internet that allows students to perform authentic, independent tasks while using the computer. WebQuests give individuals or small groups of learners the opportunity to use research, problem solving, and basic skills as they move through a process of finding out, drawing conclusions about, and developing a product related to a topic or question.
Here are additional webquests that are presented by grade level

Learning Contracts


Learning Contracts: A
greements between students and teachers that grant the student certain freedoms and choices about completing tasks yet require the student to meet certain specifications.

Here is a great site for how to create and use learning contract

The Curriculum Compactor


Curriculum Compacting:
Modifying or "streamlining" the regular curriculum in order to eliminate repetition of previously mastered materials and to provide time for appropriate enrichment and or acceleration activities while ensuring mastery of basic skills . Students “compact” or eliminate material already mastered and move ahead to more challenging work.

Resource: Theory Behind Curriculum Compacting
Resource: Slideshow of Tips for Implementation





http://www.springhurst.org/articles/susan.htm